“Tonight At Noon” – A celebration of The Mersey Sound

A series of events and exhibitions are to take place in Liverpool to celebrate the 50th anniversary of one of the most influential poetry anthologies of all time

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adrian-henri-roger-mcgough-and-brian-patten-the-mersey-sound-1967The Mersey Sound by Liverpool poets Adrian Henri, Roger McGough and Brian Patten was first published in May 1967 and is one of the world’s bestselling poetry anthologies.

To mark this special anniversary, Tonight At Noon (named after the first Adrian Henri poem in the collection) will shine a spotlight on this incredible piece of work which captured the mood of the Sixties and brought poetry down from the shelf to the street.

Forming a key part of Liverpool’s 67-17: 50 Summers of Love celebrations, Tonight At Noon is a festival in itself running from Wednesday 12 April to Saturday 15 July, and the events are:

The Mersey Sound Archives

An exhibition in Hornby Library, Liverpool Central Library – Wednesday 12 April to Saturday 15 July. FREE

A tribute to the publishing phenomenon which saw three Liverpool writers make poetry part of popular culture. They wrote of young love, pop idols, atomic bombs, eccentric bus conductors and sci-fi superheroes in poems that were contemporary, urban and accessible. This exhibition takes place in the stunning surroundings of the Hornby Library and will include displays of original manuscripts, posters, letters, key documents along with audio and visual material which trace the emergence of Adrian, Roger and Brian on the 1960s poetry scene.

Adrian Henri – Painter, Poet, Performer

An exhibition in Dickens and Gladstone Galleries, St George’s Hall – Wednesday 12 April to Saturday 15 July. FREE

Although he came to prominence as a poet in 1967, Adrian Henri was regarded as a ‘total artist’ having trained as a painter and exhibiting widely throughout his career. He also fronted the unlikely poetry-and-rock band Liverpool Scene, leading John Peel to dub him “one of the great non-singers of our time”. In 1969 the band supported Led Zeppelin, played the Isle of Wight Festival and toured America.  This exhibition will showcase 1960s artworks, poems and original rock posters offering a glimpse into to Henri’s multi-faceted talents.

Poetry in the City

An anniversary treat at various locations, Thursday 25 May. FREE

To mark the exact day on which The Mersey Sound was first published, expect the city to be taken over by the words of the three poets as their work hits the streets once again. Full details will be revealed nearer the time.

Thurston Moore Concert

Concert Room, St George’s Hall – 8.30pm, Tuesday 30 May. £14 a ticket plus booking fee

Thurston Moore is best known for being the co-founder of legendary alternative rock group Sonic Youth. His use of unusual tunings and distorted sounds have had an impact on experimental and post-punk music the world over, and he has been ranked by Rolling Stone as one of the greatest guitarists of all time. Moore has collaborated with writers, musicians and artists as varied as Yoko Ono, William Burroughs, Merce Cunningham and Sean Lennon. He is also a poet and a fan of The Mersey Sound. Thurston is on a world tour to promote his latest album RocknRoll Consciousness, but he will stop off in Liverpool to perform a specially commissioned musical response to The Mersey Sound. Tickets are available from www.ticketquarter.co.uk/Online/thurston-moore.

New Writing

Poetry reading at Bluecoat – 7.30pm, Friday 16 June. £10 a ticket

The impact of The Mersey Sound has resonated for decades for generations of writers and performers. Five poets have been commissioned to create new pieces of work in response to the writing of Henri, McGough and Patten. Taking part are award winning poets Paul Farley, Deryn Rees-Jones, Eleanor Rees, Lizzie Nunnery and Andrew McMillan. They will be joined onstage by Brian Patten and Roger McGough. Tickets are available from:  www.thebluecoat.org.uk/content/tickets

Adrian’s partner, Catherine Marcangeli has curated all the Tonight At Noon events which have been commissioned by Liverpool City Council.

 

A step back in time……….The Cavern’s swinging 60th.

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Fantastic week in Liverpool city centre around the Cavern quarter, the heart of the city’s musical heritage and well known across the globe, with hundreds still flocking each day to pay their tributes, now 60 years since it opened.

Celebrations began with a performance last week at the Philharmonic Hall, featuring sixties tribute band The Overtures leading the line-up at ‘The History of the Cavern’ with funds raised going to BBC Children in Need and Radio City’s Cash for Kids.

Thoroughly enjoyed the packed out show which crafted the clubs vibrant music scene through the decades and featuring tribute acts like the Rolling Stones, Yardbirds and Queen much to the delight of the audience.

With a magical history and a music venue that is still attracting prominent names, the Cavern will shortly be releasing a 60th anniversary documentary and book.

2016 saw the club welcome the likes of blues-rock star Joe Bonamassa and Big Country perform on the iconic stage and the recently published 2017 list includes some big names with the likes of soul singer Geno Washington, Simple Minds drummer Mel Gaynor and guitarist Albert Lee.

The unveiling of the Cilla Black statue outside the original Cavern entrance provided a media frenzy with masses vying for a selfie. The Liver Birds may be Liverpool’s most famous sculptures but from their lofty perches, these watchful avians have witnessed countless others spring up across the city over the years. This statue is certainly a diamond in our city attracting a cult following second to none.
Our grand city plays host to more statues than any other in the UK outside of London.

You can now add Cilla to a whole fleet of sculptures across the city, and together, when arriving at Lime Street station with a “Harry Dazzy Boreal” greeting from Doddy, you can put together a walking tour that spans the St Georges Hall plateau with Wellington, Victoria and Albert, past Eleanor Rigby, through the narrow enclaves of Matthew Street and then onto the John Lennon Peace monument at Kings Dock.

This year marks a number of our culturally renowned city’s most popular and prominent venues prepare to mark big birthdays in the months ahead, so keep an eye open for some visually, entertaining and exciting events during this cultural milestone year.

Learn about Liverpool’s history with new Central Library course

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A BRAND new course is on offer for anyone who wants to uncover their family tree and learn more about the history of Liverpool

For the first time, Liverpool Record Office is running a special five week course, which starts on Monday 13 February (2-4pm), to give people all the know-how they need on how to trace their family tree, giving them a guide to how to use Liverpool’s Record Office including accessing school and housing records as well as giving access to amazing archived Liverpool images.

In My Liverpool Home will be delivered by Central Library’s experienced and knowledgeable team, it will give people the opportunity to view and understand how to access archives which date back to the 13th century, and will also provide a rare chance to see behind the scenes and visit the purpose-built repository and conservation studio.

Taking place on the fourth floor of Central Library each week of In My Liverpool Home will cover:

  • Week One – A guide to the Record Office and its unique resources and how to use them.
  • Week Two – Learn about school records which also includes industrial schools which were for children who had lost one, or both, parents.
  • Week Three – Look at the impact of the workhouses in Liverpool.
  • Week Four – This will introduce people to the resources available at the library for discovering the history of houses and the conditions most working class people had to live in.
  • Week Five – This will give people the opportunity to see a photographic history of Liverpool, dating back to the 1850s.

The course will take place each Monday from 13 February until 13 March and each session costs £25. If anyone signs up to the entire course they only pay £100.

Advance booking is essential and this can be done either by emailing archives@liverpool.gov.uk giving your name, contact details and stating clearly which week you’d like to attend or whether you would like to take part in the full course. Applications can also be made via post to: In My Liverpool Home, Record Office, Central Library, William Brown Street, Liverpool, L3 8EW. Enquiries can also be made at Central Library. Payments can be made on the day of the course.

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